bundy
bundy
york
york
u.s.
u.s.
obama
obama
search
search
marathon
marathon
zoo
zoo
houston
houston
Our nation is built upon a legacy of discovery, innovation, and ingenuity – forged over centuries by creative minds, inventors, and thinkers who inspire American citizens, and especially young people, to discover and solve problems in the world around them. Throughout history, these STEM all-stars have gone to great lengths—including to the heights of Earth’s atmosphere; the depths of our oceans, and into the far reaches of space—in order to unlock new discoveries and expand the frontiers of knowledge. These “extreme” scientists and engineers conduct their work atop mountains and volcanoes, in frigid temperatures, at high speeds, and on the ocean floor – all in pursuit of new insights that will push the boundaries of science and technology. On Tuesday, April 22 at 4:00 pm ET, the White House will host a new episode of We the Geeks on extreme science. Tune in to this Google+ Hangout to hear from some incredible scientists who are doing research at the edges of the Earth and beyond in pursuit of extreme science! Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere; Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and former NASA astronaut Lieutenant Don Walsh, Deep Sea Explorer and Oceanographer –was on the first mission to reach and explore the deepest part of the world's ocean Forrest Jehlik, Research Engineer at Argonne National Laboratory’s Center for Transportation Research—is testing the limits of engine components and fuels as the head of the Green Racing Program Robin E. Bell, Marine Geology and Geophysics Research Professor, Columbia University Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory— studies sub-glacial lakes, ice sheet dynamics and tectonics in Antarctica Tom Marshburn, NASA Astronaut and Physician—a NASA mission veteran who has completed space walks and underwater missions as an “aquanaut” Viewers can join the conversation by asking questions on Twitter using #WeTheGeeks. And you can view the hangout Tuesday at 4:00 pm ET by visiting www.WhiteHouse.gov/WeTheGeeks. read more
  • 23/04/2014, 21:21
An Israeli and Palestinian, Brought Together by Breast Cancer "We are not the ones at war," Ibtisam told me. "It’s our governments, not us."
  • 23/04/2014, 21:21
Dime Stories: Some Etiquette Tips from Tony By Tony Fitzpatrick There is a fancy-schmancy health club to which some very prominent Chicagoans belong. It is full of upscale lawyers, doctors, business-types, and famous athletes. It offers yoga, swimming, tennis, racquetball, squash—yes, Old Chap, squash—handball, boxing, Pilates (whatever the fuck that is) and spinning, which as far as I can tell means riding […]
  • 23/04/2014, 21:20
LIVE COVERAGE: Baltimore News Watch blog
  • 23/04/2014, 21:16
Today is Earth Day, an important time to reflect on the importance of protecting the future health of our planet in the face of climate change. But this challenge is bigger than one day of action, and we all have to play a role in forging a healthier, greener and better world for our children-- not just on Earth Day, but every day. Here are some great tools to help you do your part throughout the year by saving energy and increasing energy efficiency at home and on the road. How energy efficient is your home? EPA's Home Energy Yardstick provides a simple assessment of your home's annual energy use compared to similar homes. Answer a few basic questions about your home to see: Your home's Home Energy Yardstick score on a scale of 1 to 10 Insights into how much of your home's energy use is related to heating and cooling versus other everyday uses like appliances, lighting, and hot water Links to guidance from ENERGY STAR on how to increase your home's score, improve comfort, and lower utility bills An estimate of your home's annual carbon emissions Get started here read more
  • 23/04/2014, 21:16
This Is How Empires Collapse Submitted by Charles Hugh-Smith of OfTwoMinds blog, This is how empires collapse: one complicit participant at a time.Before an empire collapses, it first erodes from within. The collapse may appear sudden, but the processes of internal rot hollowed out the resilience, resolve, purpose and vitality of the empire long before its final implosion.What are these processes of internal rot? Here are a few of the most pervasive and destructive forces of internal corrosion:1. Each institution within the system loses sight of its original purpose of serving the populace and becomes self-serving. This erosion of common purpose serving the common good is so gradual that participants forget there was a time when the focus wasn't on gaming the system to avoid work and accountability but serving the common good.2. The corrupt Status Quo corrupts every individual who works within the system.Once an institution loses its original purpose and becomes self-serving, everyone within either seeks to maximize their own personal share of the swag and minimize their accountability, or they are forced out as a potentially dangerous uncorrupted insider.The justification is always the same: everybody else is getting away with it, why shouldn't I? Empires decline one corruptible individual at a time.3. Self-serving institutions select sociopathic leaders whose skills are not competency or leadership but conning others into believing the institution is functioning optimally when in reality it is faltering/failing.The late Roman Empire offers a fine example: entire Army legions in the hinterlands were listed as full-strength on the official rolls in Rome and payroll was issued accordingly, but the legions only existed on paper: corrupt officials pocketed the payroll for phantom legions.Self-serving institutions reward con-artists in leadership roles because only con-artists can mask the internal rot with happy-story PR and get away with it.4. The institutional memory rewards conserving the existing Status Quo and punishes innovation. Innovation necessarily entails risk, and those busy feathering their own nests (i.e. accepting money for phantom work, phantom legions, etc.) have no desire to place their share of the swag at risk just to improve sagging output and accountability.So reforms and innovations that might salvage the institution are shelved or buried.5. As the sunk costs of the subsystems increase, the institutional resistance to new technologies and processes increases accordingly. Those manufacturing steam locomotives in the early 20th century had an enormous amount of capital and institutional knowledge sunk in their factories. Tossing all of that out to invest in building diesel-electric locomotives that were much more efficient than the old-tech steam locomotives made little sense to those looking at sunk costs.As a result, the steam locomotive manufacturers clung to the old ways and went out of business. The sunk costs of empire are enormous, as is the internal resistance to change.6. Institutional memory and knowledge support "doing more of what worked in the past" even when it is clearly failing. I refer to this institutional risk-avoidance and lack of imagination as doing more of what has failed spectacularly.Inept leadership keeps doing more of what once worked, even when it is clearly failing, in effect ignoring real-world feedback in favor of magical-thinking. The Federal Reserve is an excellent example.7. These dynamics of eroding accountability, effectiveness and purpose lead to systemic diminishing returns. Each failing institution now needs more money to sustain its operations, as inefficiencies, corruption and incompetence reduce output while dramatically raising costs (phantom legions still get paid).8. Incompetence is rewarded and competence punished. The classic example of this was "Good job, Brownie:" cronies and con-artists are elevated to leadership roles to reward loyalty and the ability to mask the rot with good PR. Serving the common good is set aside as sychophancy (obedient flattery) to incompetent leaders is rewarded and real competence is punished as a threat to the self-serving leadership.9. As returns diminish and costs rise, systemic fragility increases. This can be illustrated as a rising wedge: as output declines and costs rise, the break-even point keeps edging higher, until even a modest reduction of input (revenue, energy, etc.) causes the system to break down:A modern-day example is oil-exporting states that have bought the complicity of their citizenry with generous welfare benefits and subsidies. As their populations and welfare benefits keep rising, the revenues they need to keep the system going require an ever-higher price of oil. Should the price of oil decline, these regimes will be unable to fund their welfare. With the social contract broken, there is nothing left to stem the tide of revolt.10. Economies of scale no longer generate returns. In the good old days, stretching out supply lines to reach lower-cost suppliers and digitizing management reaped huge gains in productivity. Now that the scale of enterprise is global, the gains from economies of scale have faltered and the high overhead costs of maintaining this vast managerial infrastructure have become a drain.11. Redundancy is sacrificed to preserve a corrupt and failing core. Rather than demand sacrifices of the Roman Elites and the entertainment-addicted bread-and-circus masses to maintain the forces protecting the Imperial borders, late-Roman Empire leaders eliminated defense-in-depth (redundancy). This left the borders thinly defended. With no legions in reserve, an invasion could no longer be stopped without mobilizing the entire border defense, in effect leaving huge swaths of the border undefended to push back the invaders.Phantom legions line the pockets of insiders and cronies while creating a useful illusion of stability and strength.12. The feedback from those tasked with doing the real work of the Empire is ignored as Elites and vested interests dominate decision-making. As I noted yesterday in The Political Poison of Vested Interests, when this bottoms-up feedback is tossed out, ignored or marginalized, all decisions are necessarily unwise because they are no longer grounded in the consequences experienced by the 95% doing the real work.This lack of feedback from the bottom 95% is captured by the expression "Let them eat cake." (Though attributed to Marie Antoinette, there is no evidence that she actually said Qu'ils mangent de la brioche.)The point is that decisions made with no feedback from the real-world of the bottom 95%, that is, decisions made solely in response to the demands of cronies, vested interests and various elites, are intrinsically unsound and doomed to fail catastrophically.How does an Empire end up with phantom legions? The same way the U.S. ended up with ObamaCare/Affordable Care Act. The payroll is being paid but there is no real-world feedback, no accountability, no purpose other than private profit/gain and no common good being served.That's how empires collapse: one corrupted, self-serving individual at a time, gaming one corrupted, self-serving institution or another; it no longer matters which one because they're all equally compromised. It's not just the border legions that are phantom; the entire stability and strength of the empire is phantom. The uncorruptible and competent are banished or punished, and the corrupt, self-serving and inept are lavished with treasure.This is how empires collapse: one complicit participant at a time.
  • 23/04/2014, 21:15
Gun checks miss millions of fugitives Fugitives can buy guns illegally because police fail to put their names into a database.
  • 23/04/2014, 21:12
Halloween Recipe Book Offers All Natural, Gluten-Free Treats If you are like me, on a diet, and know that the many sugary treats around Halloween time are going to be a bit of a temptation, fear not. A healthy and - more importantly - absolutely delicious alternative has arrived in...
  • 23/04/2014, 21:12
Study: Bullied Kids at Risk for Mental Health Problems 40 Years Later Frequent and occasional bullying were both associated with a higher risk for depression, psychological distress, suicidal thoughts, and anxiety disorders in middle age.
  • 23/04/2014, 21:06
Jeb Bush: I'm 'thinking about' 2016 run His speech in New York is the most vocal he's been about 2016 so far.
  • 23/04/2014, 21:05
Navy Midshipmen Receive the Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy for the Ninth Time in 11 Seasons Watch on YouTube This afternoon, the President welcomed the U.S. Naval Academy’s football team to the White House to receive the Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy once again. Since 1972, the trophy has been awarded each season to the winner of a triangular series between the Army Black Knights, the Navy Midshipmen, and the Air Force Falcons. Today marked Navy’s ninth time receiving the trophy in the past 11 years. Talk about a hot streak. read more
  • 23/04/2014, 21:05
...